Locked up with a Superior Mind

Choosing Ebenezer

I refuse to pay for cable TV, which means that I use a simple antenna to get whatever programming flows into the evening.  The other night I was wading through the TV wasteland when I came across an old movie I had seen multiple times before.  It’s titled Meatballs.  It was one of those commercial vehicles that made money for Bill Murray in his younger days.  It was much as I remembered it, though there was more sexual harassment and vulgar comedy than I recalled.  The big inspirational speech Murray gave at one point was vintage fun, and just as stirring as it was way-back-when.

The film itself did not have much of a story.  It was simple-minded, superficial, juvenile–perfectly tuned to the audience it intended to entrap.  I wonder now if Murray looks back on some of those scenes (and the ideas behind them) and cringes a little. …

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“So it goes.”

Choosing Ebenezer

Since there isn’t anyone reading this blog, I think I will please myself alone and write about MY writer, the writer who wrote things for me, though he may not have known he was writing for a chubby girl in New Mexico.  How did he come into my life?  I’m not sure.  I am almost certain it was by way of my oldest brother Dean McCollaum.  Dean was always bringing home books that had been assigned to him in his various colleges, and I was drawn to them–moth to the flame, moth to the flame.

The first one I remember clearly is Cat’s Cradle.  It’s really an amazing book, about how things can go just terribly wrong, in a moment.  It centers on the idea of helping Marines get out of battling in the mud, an invention that causes water to freeze at much higher temperatures than it does…

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Reading a Book

Choosing Ebenezer

I don’t have much to say today because I’m in the midst of reading a book–an actual, physical novel with characters and settings and a plot.  I absolutely love reading books, but I’m surprised at how much effort it takes for me to read one.  This is partly because I have visitors right now.  My second brother and his wife are here, and I like to cook for family when they are around.  Plus, I have moved laundry to Friday during the summer.

I’m not going to talk about the particular book here, but I will talk a little about the reading experience before I get back to it.  I’ll save my review of the book for when I have it finished (hopefully sometime tomorrow).

Reading a book, a novel especially, has a secret world quality to it.  I open the pages, and suddenly I’m in another place with other…

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Battle-axe

There’s another word that’s similar from the world of archetypes–crone.  These terms would not be insults if our culture had the right attitude about age.  White hair should be considered a mark of wisdom and earned respect.  (I write this though I have my white hairs carefully dyed about once a month.)  A battle-axe can hurt you if you cross the wrong line, but she will always try and make things fair, worthwhile, beautiful, and true.  I consider myself a battle-axe in training.  Just a few more years, and watch it!

Source: Battle-axe

You’ll See, Finally!

This is great. Thank you Eva.

Choosing Ebenezer

I have been promising to post a video essay about Roswell for a few days now, and here it comes.  It’s actually a scavenger hunt.  It involves fifteen public and easy to find locations here in Roswell.  It has only one reference to aliens.  Don’t get me wrong.  I love the alien thing about this town.  I have written about this before, so I will not go into it here.

The thing is, it can be really easy to drive right past perfectly beautiful places and moments in this town and not realize you’re doing it.  The challenge every creative person faces is subject, but you are the subject.  Your life is the source, and if you live in Roswell, then this is the beginning of your inspiration.  A couple of years ago I did a project which involved taking a picture of sunset every day.  It was an important…

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By the Eye

Thank you Eva. Another great post

Choosing Ebenezer

In anticipation of A Bookish Affair, I’ve been planning a photographic essay about good old Roswell, America.  By photographic essay, I mean I have set of images that I’m going to try and get of this town that show it off and ask those who live in it if they have REALLY seen it.  People are probably now required to be more visually astute than ever before, but I’m not sure if we are always using our eyes to our advantage.

As a reader from my early childhood, I’ve never been great with my eyes.  My nose and eyes were always buried in a book. Neither my mother nor my father needed glasses in youth, but all four of their children have–all of us.  I’m the lucky one that is MOST myopic.  Yep, I’m the only girl; I got the fat gene; I’ve worn glasses since I was nine, so…

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Hard Advice

Great advice. I really liked the part about finding your reader. Thank you Eva

Choosing Ebenezer

Just about anyone who has ever wanted to write has sought advice from an expert of one sort or another.  I certainly have.  I have been chasing this particular dragon since I was a kid, beginning the year I turned fourteen and tried to write a novel on an old Underwood manual my mother had cast off.  I managed a book just under twenty pages that was set in New York and involved a young woman choosing various outfits.  (This ill-advised attempt was never finished.) I began in earnest to pursue writing twenty-eight years ago.  By “in earnest” I mean I said it out loud.  I started taking classes.  I’ve studied with some really great writers, and I’ve read their work, and I’ve listened to their lectures, and I’ve gotten the standard advice.  I’ve gotten advice about scheduling protected writing times, advice about where to send material, advice about how…

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The Big Question

Choosing Ebenezer

So…I started teaching professionally (officially) in 1985.  I was interviewed by Hector Madrid, the principal of Deming High at the time, and his assistant principal and activities director.  They were all three at a convention in Albuquerque, and I drove up there from Socorro for the interview.  I have not been as nervous since.

They offered me a teaching job in English, then two weeks before the school year started they called me up and said they were moving me to Math.  I remember the night before my first day.  I lay in bed thinking, “I can’t teach Math.  I don’t know enough Math to teach Math.”  The next day I gave my first lesson, and I was immediately reassured.  I didn’t know much, but those kids…they knew N-O-T-H-I-N-G!  I couldn’t help but teach them.  They seemed to be WITHOUT any knowledge.  It was great, teaching Math that first year. …

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